December 26, 2022

Evan Schwartz

The 7 Types of Runs and How to Use Them to Become Faster

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As a runner, it's important to incorporate a variety of different types of runs into your training plan in order to improve your overall fitness and performance. Here is a brief overview of some of the most common types of runs:


1. The Easy / Recovery Run


Also known as "recovery runs," easy runs are meant to be just that – easy. These runs should be done at a comfortable pace, typically around 60-70% of your maximum heart rate. Easy runs help to improve your endurance and can also help to reduce the risk of injury by giving your body a chance to recover from harder workouts.


2. Medium Long Runs


These runs are typically longer than easy runs but shorter than long runs, and are meant to be done at a moderate intensity. The exact distance of a medium long run will vary depending on your fitness level, but it is generally considered to be anywhere from 6-12 miles. These runs can help to improve your endurance and build up your stamina for longer races.


3. Strides


Strides are short bursts of speed, usually done at the end of an easy run or as a standalone workout. They typically last around 20-30 seconds and are meant to help improve your running form and leg turnover.


4. Track Intervals


Interval training involves alternating periods of high-intensity effort with periods of rest or easy running. Track intervals are a specific type of interval workout that is done on a track, with the intervals typically ranging from 400 meters to 1 mile in length. Interval training can help to improve your speed and power.


5. Threshold Runs


Threshold runs are meant to be done at a pace that is just below your lactate threshold, or the point at which your body starts to produce lactic acid faster than it can be removed. These runs are typically done at a moderate to hard intensity and can help to improve your endurance and speed.


6. Tempo Runs


Tempo runs are meant to be done at a moderate to hard intensity, usually around your lactate threshold pace. These runs can help to improve your endurance and speed, and can also be used as a way to practice running at race pace.


7. The Long Run


As the name suggests, long runs are meant to be done at a relatively easy pace and are typically the longest runs of the week. The distance of a long run will vary depending on your fitness level and training goals, but it is generally considered to be anywhere from 8-20 miles. Long runs help to improve your endurance and build up your stamina for longer races.


Conclusion:


Incorporating a variety of different types of runs into your training plan can help to improve your overall fitness and performance as a runner. It's important to listen to your body and adjust the intensity and duration of your workouts as needed in order to avoid overtraining and stay healthy.


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Photo courtesy Sporlab

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